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GRC in Uncertain Times: 2016 and into 2017

In the past month there have been a lot of posts, articles, and discussion on the impact of Trump’s presidency on the GRC market, particularly compliance. Some fear that the need for compliance management within organizations is not going to be as strong as a Trump administration looks to deregulate. My perspective is that compliance management will continue to grow within organizations no matter who is in office. Whether conservative or liberal, regulations have grown and grown over the years. While President-Elect Trump is not your typical candidate, he is already toning down some of the rhetoric that he used during the campaign and coming to reality. There may be shifts in focus in certain areas, but ethics and compliance will remain a strong need within organizations for many years to come. HOWEVER, the focus of the question should not be on compliance but on what the forecast looks like for risk management. While organizations will continue to need compliance processes and technologies, organizations will see a renewed focus and energy on risk management processes and related technologies. Times are uncertain. 2016 has brought us Brexit, a forthcoming Trump administration, and turmoil politically around the world, particularly in European election possibilities. Economically things are topsy turvy with the British Pound, European Euro, caution on an outlook in China. As I look to 2017 one word continues to come to mind: UNCERTAINTY. If we go to ISO 31000 for a definition of risk, “risk is the effect of uncertainty on objectives.” Organizations face a world of uncertainty in 2017 and need defined risk management processes and systems in place to be able to manage risk in context of objectives. As we close 2016 and move into 2017, GRC 20/20 is seeing growing inquiries from organizations looking to improve risk management related processes and are asking questions related to risk management technologies to enable these processes. It is interesting, the current OCEG GRC Maturity Survey, that GRC 20/20 Research collaborates on and authors, show a change in the respondents. This survey was fielded over the past two months and has 697 respondents with 578 of them in roles managing GRC internally within their organization. The past several GRC Maturity Surveys had Compliance and Ethics as the primary role responding to the survey, this year (the past few months to be specific) it is Risk Management roles that are the number one responder. Consider joining the webinar to learn more on the findings. GRC 20/20 is seeing increased interest in enterprise and operational risk management technologies, but also increased interest in solutions for geo-political risk management, third party (vendor/supplier) risk management, IT/information security risk management, EH&S, and business continuity management. What are your thoughts on 2017 and the outlook for GRC Related processes and systems? I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

ACL Connections 2016

[button link=”https://lockpath.com/event/lockpath-ready-summit-2016-10-04/”]Learn More[/button] [tabs style=”default”] [tab title=”Overview”] Join us for our customer conference this year to experience the biggest releases in ACL history. [/tab] [tab title=”GRC 20/20 Participation”] GRC 20/20’s, Michael Rasmussen, The GRC Pundit, will be attending this event as an analyst participant. rasmussenMichael Rasmussen – The GRC Pundit @ GRC 20/20 Research, Michael Rasmussen is an internationally recognized pundit on governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC) – with specific expertise on the topics of GRC strategy, process, information, and technology architectures and solutions. With 23+ years of experience, Michael helps organizations improve GRC processes, design and implement GRC architectures, and select solutions that are effective, efficient, and agile. He is a sought-after keynote speaker, author, and advisor and is noted as the “Father of GRC” — being the first to define and model the GRC market in February 2002 while at Forrester Research, Inc. [/tab] [tab title=”Benefits”]
Conference registration fee includes:
  • Intensive hands-on workshop on Wednesday
  • Access to all conference sessions
  • All meal functions as outlined in the agenda
  • A fun-filled evening’s entertainment on Monday
  • 18 CPE credits
[/tab] [tab title=”Who Should Attend”]
  • Audit Professionals
  • Internal Control Professionals
  • Risk Management Professionals
  • Finance and Accounting Professionals
  • Fraud Analysts & Investigators
  • Compliance & Ethics Professionals
  • IT and IT Security Professionals
  • Business Continuity Professionals
  • Legal Professionals
[/tab] [tab title=”Conference Host”]
ACL-FinalLogo-color-notagACL is a software company with a vision for the future of the Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (GRC) professions: a community of compliance pros, auditors, risk management experts, IT and finance teams who are sought after for the value they deliver to their organizations. Through a unique combination of extreme ease-of-use, cloud delivery and the integration of industry standard risk analytics, ACL’s platform helps people focus more time on identifying and managing the highest-impact risks. [/tab] [/tabs]

Integrated Risk Management: Preventing Risks and Solving Risk Problems

[button link=”http://www2.riskonnect.com/GRC2020″]Register[/button] [tabs style=”default”] [tab title=”Summary”] Risk and risk management is pervasive throughout organizations. There are many departments that manage risk, each with their unique understanding, models, and views into risk. This makes enterprise and operational risk management a challenge. Organizations fail in enterprise risk management strategies when they force everyone into one flat view of risk, they also fail when they allow different views of risk but do not do risk normalization and aggregation as they roll-up risk into enterprise reporting. This webinar details how organizations need to take an integrated approach to risk management that allows different departments their view of department level risk management but also enable a common integrated architecture to support overall enterprise risk management activities and reporting. Specific points covered in this webinar include:
  • Where and how enterprise risk management fails
  • How to build an enterprise risk register and show interrelationships of risk
  • The value of an integrated risk management architecture
  • Approaches to risk normalization and aggregation for accurate enterprise risk reporting
[/tab] [tab title=”GRC 20/20 Presenter”] rasmussenMichael Rasmussen – The GRC Pundit @ GRC 20/20 Research, Michael Rasmussen is an internationally recognized pundit on governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC) – with specific expertise on the topics of GRC strategy, process, information, and technology architectures and solutions. With 23+ years of experience, Michael helps organizations improve GRC processes, design and implement GRC architectures, and select solutions that are effective, efficient, and agile. He is a sought-after keynote speaker, author, and advisor and is noted as the “Father of GRC” — being the first to define and model the GRC market in February 2002 while at Forrester Research, Inc. [/tab] [tab title=”Webinar Sponsor”]
new-flat-rk-logo4Riskonnect, Inc. is the provider of a technology platform for the risk management industry.  As an independent innovator in risk management technology, Riskonnect develops and markets a growing suite of technology solutions on a world-class cloud computing model, helping clients elevate their risk management programs, safety solutions and programs for management of risks across the enterprise.  Through Riskonnect RMIS, Riskonnect GRC, Riskonnect EHS, Riskonnect Healthcare, and other Riskonnect applications, the company provides the risk management industry with the specific, configurable solutions needed to reduce losses, control risk and affect shareholder value. [/tab][/tabs]

IBM Vision 2016

Outthink. Outperform

[button link=”https://www-01.ibm.com/software/analytics/vision/”]Learn More[/button] [tabs style=”default”] [tab title=”Overview”] IBM Vision 2016 is the premier global conference for finance, risk management and sales compensation professionals. Over three days, you will experience how IBM cognitive solutions can help you drive profitable growth, manage risk and optimize performance through the latest advances in analytics and cloud. This year’s tracks focus on three key areas including:
  • Governance, Risk and Compliance. See how governance, risk and compliance solutions from IBM help organizations achieve profitable growth and address the increasing demands for regulatory compliance in today’s complex marketplace.
  • Financial & Operational Performance Management. Learn how IBM Business Analytics solutions improve performance reporting and scorecarding, planning, analysis and forecasting, profitability modeling, financial consolidation and regulatory reporting.
  • Sales Performance Management. IBM’s sales performance management solutions improve sales results and operational efficiencies with better management of incentive compensation plans, and smarter administration of sales territories and quotas.
[/tab] [tab title=”GRC 20/20 Participation”] GRC 20/20’s, Michael Rasmussen, The GRC Pundit, will be attending this event as an analyst participant. rasmussenMichael Rasmussen – The GRC Pundit @ GRC 20/20 Research, Michael Rasmussen is an internationally recognized pundit on governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC) – with specific expertise on the topics of GRC strategy, process, information, and technology architectures and solutions. With 23+ years of experience, Michael helps organizations improve GRC processes, design and implement GRC architectures, and select solutions that are effective, efficient, and agile. He is a sought-after keynote speaker, author, and advisor and is noted as the “Father of GRC” — being the first to define and model the GRC market in February 2002 while at Forrester Research, Inc. [/tab] [tab title=”Benefits”] At Vision 2016, you will learn how to capitalize on the latest advances in analytics to turn your company into a cognitive business. Along with keynotes from industry thought leaders and real-world case studies from customers and product experts, Vision 2016 offers more than 120 sessions and workshops. You’ll get a first-hand look at the latest innovations in IBM Cognos TM1, IBM Cognos Disclosure Management, IBM Controller, IBM Cognos Sales Performance Management, IBM OpenPages Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) solutions, IBM Cognos Business Intelligence, IBM SPSS products and more. Learn about the key solutions and strategies you need to address challenges that are top-of-mind for chief financial officers, chief risk officers, chief compliance officers and sales compensation professionals in virtually all industries. Join us, and learn how to:
  • Transform your finance, risk, and sales operations organizations by capitalizing on the latest innovations in cognitive computing, analytics, cloud and other key areas.
  • Build relevant analytical capabilities to drive profitable growth.
  • Use the latest cognitive tools, synthesize information, see trends and deliver insights to improve decision quality.
  • Leverage the cloud to scale your solution platform quickly, while reducing costs.
  • Enhance planning, budgeting, forecasting, reporting, analysis, and internal control, plus risk management, compliance, and sales performance management.
  • Implement best practices developed by leading IBM customers and product experts.
[/tab] [tab title=”Who Should Attend”]
  • Board of Directors & Executives
  • Chief Executive Officers
  • Finance and Accounting Professionals
  • IT and IT Security Professionals
  • Audit Professionals
  • Risk Management Professionals
  • Compliance & Ethics Professionals
  • Internal Control Professionals
  • Business Continuity Professionals
  • Fraud Analysts & Investigators
  • Legal Professionals
[/tab] [tab title=”Conference Host”]
Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 10.28.23 PM Each day, we create 4.5 quintillion bytes of data from a variety of sources—from climate information
 to posts on social media sites, purchase transaction records and medical images.  IBM has the world’s most comprehensive portfolio of data and analytics capabilities in the market. Our strategy is to help enterprises across all industries extract new insights from the explosion of available data to drive competitive advantage. IBM delivers a full spectrum of analytics—from descriptive, predictive and prescriptive to cognitive—to turn big data into big insights and reinvent how decisions are made. We also provide talent management and social collaboration solutions powered by workforce science and cognitive analytics capabilities. We also provide talent management and social collaboration solutions powered by workforce science and cognitive analytics capabilities. We have arrived at an inflection point where data is available
at such a scale that analytics can be applied to solve problems and yield real-time results in ways never before possible. IBM Analytics can help developers innovate faster and more securely, help business professionals find a smarter way to work via better problem solving and collaboration, and help enterprises gain deeper insight faster.
[/tab] [/tabs]

Risk Management by Design Workshop

March 16 All day

Blueprint for an Effective, Efficient & Agile Risk Management Program

[button link=”mailto:events@lockpath.com”]Learn More[/button] This workshop is for risk management practitioners within their organizations, solution providers and professional service firms are not allowed to register except by special invite of the sponsor. This $499 value includes a networking breakfast and lunch, and up to eight continuity education credit hours in a certificate to be submitted by the attendee for CPEs to the association(s) of their choice. [tabs style=”default”] [tab title=”Overview”] Managing risk is one of the most challenging endeavors of modern business. The way most organizations approach risk management is often ineffective and inefficient. Some attempt to manage risk in silos and fail to see the big picture. Others try to impose a one-size-fit-all strategy across the enterprise that fails to account for the complexities and intricacies of organizations. The effective, efficient and agile approach to risk management is one that is integrated into a company’s overall strategy and operations, and supported by integrated risk information architecture that provides 360-degree situational awareness. Risk Management by Design is a one-day workshop that will provide a blueprint on effective risk management strategies in a dynamic business environment. Attendees will learn risk management strategies and techniques for enterprise-level and departmental initiatives. Through lectures, discussion with peers, and applicable exercises, attendees will gain a better understanding of:
  • Risk in the context of business performance, strategy, objectives, culture, and values.
  • How risk management processes flow out of the business strategy and integrates into its overall operations.
  • Defining an information architecture that enables risk strategy and processes by providing 360° situational awareness of risk in context of business strategy and operations
  • The necessary technology components needed to bring together diverse and distributed risk management roles.
[/tab] [tab title=”Agenda”]

Part 1

What is Risk? Understanding Risk in the Context of the Organization
  • Different views of risk throughout the organization
  • Who owns risk?
  • Understanding risk and its role in business strategy, objectives, performances, and operations
  • Workshop Project & Discussion

Morning Break

Part 2

Federated Risk Management: Blueprint for Risk Management Collaboration and Strategy
  • Developing a risk committee (or herding cats), bringing together the range of risk roles in the organization
  • Defining a risk management charter
  • Developing a collaborative and enterprise view of risk
  • Workshop Project & Discussion

Lunch Break

Part 3

Risk Management Process Lifecycle: Integrated Processes to Identify, Analyze, Manage, and Communicate Risk
  • Risk identification – Collaborative process to identify risk from both the bottom and the top
  • Risk analysis – Understanding and contrasting risk assessment & analysis techniques
  • Risk management – Strategies to mitigate and reduce risk
  • Risk communication – Assign and manage risk ownership and accountability
  • Workshop Project & Discussion

Afternoon Break

Part 4

Risk Management Information & Technology Architecture: Providing an Integrated View of Risk to the Enterprise Without Losing Value to the Department
  • Developing a risk taxonomy and attributes of risk and risk ranking
  • Addressing risk normalization and aggregation for enterprise risk reporting
  • Monitoring risk in a changing environment
  • Technology capabilities and considerations to support risk management
  • Workshop Project & Discussion
[/tab] [tab title=”Objectives & Benefits”] Attendees will take back to their organization approaches to address:
  • Risk Management Strategy. Understand risk in the context of business performance, strategy, objectives as well as its culture and values.
  • Risk Management Processes. Flowing from strategy are the risk management processes integrated into the organization and how it operates. Good risk management is done in the rhythm of the business.
  • Risk Management Information Architecture. Defining an information architecture that enables risk strategy and processes by providing 360° situational awareness of risk in context of business strategy and operations
  • Risk Management Technology Architecture. The necessary technology components needed to bring together diverse and distributed risk management roles and integrate risk management into the culture and operations of the organization.
Benefits to attendees:
  • Understand a top-down as well as a bottom-up approach to risk management
  • Implement risk management in the context of business strategy, process, and operations
  • Explore different risk management architecture models and how they apply to your organization
  • Discover various risk management techniques and how they apply to your business
  • Develop a risk information architecture that aligns with business operations and processes
  • Effectively communicate risk across your organizations
[/tab] [tab title=”Who Should Attend”] Who should attend?
  • Risk managers and officers responsible for leading and managing risk
  • Business managers whose job responsibilities include risk management and risk ownership
  • Executives and governance personnel who have to oversea risk
  • Audit personnel that use risk to drive audit plans and provide assurance on risk management
  • Security, health and safety, project management, compliance, and other personnel who are involved in risk management
[/tab] [tab title=”Instructor”] rasmussenMichael Rasmussen – The GRC Pundit @ GRC 20/20 Research, Michael Rasmussen is an internationally recognized pundit on governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC) – with specific expertise on the topics of GRC strategy, process, information, and technology architectures and solutions. With 23+ years of experience, Michael helps organizations improve GRC processes, design and implement GRC architectures, and select solutions that are effective, efficient, and agile. He is a sought-after keynote speaker, author, and advisor and is noted as the “Father of GRC” — being the first to define and model the GRC market in February 2002 while at Forrester Research, Inc. [/tab] [tab title=”Workshop Sponsor”]

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 2.00.21 PMLockPath was created by GRC experts who recognized the need for intuitive GRC software that was flexible and scalable to serve ever-changing and expanding organizations.

In addition to the company’s founders, LockPath’s executive team comprises top industry professionals in the fields of software development, accounting and consulting, cybersecurity, financial services, market development and other industries. LockPath employs dozens of talented professionals and has several open positions.

LockPath serves a client base of global organizations ranging from small and midsize companies to Fortune 10 enterprises across industries. Along with their ecosystem of technology and channel partners, LockPath provides unparalleled customer satisfaction from initial project discovery discussions to ongoing customer support.

[/tab] [/tabs]

Details

Date:
2016-03-16
Event Category:
Event Tags:
,
Website:
mailto:events@lockpath.com

Organizer

LockPath
Phone:
+1.913.601.4800
Email:
events@lockpath.com
Website:
www.lockpath.com

Loudermilk Center

40 Courtland Street Northeast
Atlanta, GA 30303 United States
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+1.404.507.1690
http://www.loudermilkcenter.com
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Mistakes & Challenges in Risk Management Technologies and Strategies

Risk management is pervasive throughout organizations. There are many departments that manage risk with a variety of approaches, models, needs, and views into risk. This makes enterprise and operational risk management a challenge. Organizations often fail in enterprise risk management strategies when they force everyone into one flat view of risk, they also fail when they allow different views of risk but do not consider risk normalization and aggregation as they roll-up risk into enterprise reporting. Organizations have adopted a wide range of technologies for risk management. There are several hundred solutions in the risk management market (a segment of the GRC market). Some are broad enterprise or operational risk platforms. Some solutions can be very narrow and limiting in which different departments lose capabilities they need, while other solutions can be very broad and adaptable. There are a variety of very focused risk solutions that excel at specific areas of risk management. These include:
  • Solutions focused on specific risks. These are solutions designed to manage and assess risk deeply on a very specific risk area. Such as, commodity risk, foreign exchange risk, privacy risk, model risk, and dozens of other risk areas.
  • Solutions focused on department/function risk management needs. These are solutions that are aimed at managing risks within a common department/functional area providing a common platform that specializes in risk within that area. Such as, information security, health & safety, corporate compliance, audit, finance, treasury, and more.
  • Solutions aimed at project risk management. These are solutions that help the organization manage risk in projects.
  • Solutions aimed at finance/treasury risk management. These are solutions aimed at managing an array of financial and treasury risks such as capital, market, liquidity, and credit risks.
  • Solutions aimed at operational risk management. These are solutions aimed at managing operational risks across departments to provide an integrated view of risk across business operations.
  • Solutions aimed at enterprise risk management. These are solutions that take an integrated view of strategic, finance/treasury, and operational risks (legal and compliance risk being part of operational risk). However, many solutions that advertise themselves as enterprise risk management really are only doing operational or department risk management.
  • Tools for risk management. Then there are a range of solutions that assist in risk management, but do not fit in one of the other areas. They are tools to do surveys/questionnaires/assessments. Or they assist in modeling risk such as monte carlo tools or Bayesian modeling.
The challenge is that there is not a one-stop solution for all of an organizations risk management needs. There is no a solution provider out there that addresses every area and need of risk management across the organization. In addressing this, many organizations look to risk management/GRC platforms to provide the range of capabilities they are looking for. This is done particularly when they have enterprise or operational risk management strategies to provide an integrated view of risk across the organization. HOWEVER, organizations are frequently failing in these implementations as they encounter the following issues in risk management:
  • Failing to provide top-down and bottoms up risk perspective. This is a controversial topic in the risk community, and one that I am sure I will get hammered on by opponents on either side. There are those that see that risk is all about strategy and objectives and you should do a top-down analysis of risk that starts with strategy and objectives. The other side are approaches that see risk management as a bottoms up by identifying risk at the lowest level of operations, transactions, and processes and rolling it up. My perspective is that both are needed. Risk management has to be in context of strategy and objectives, but so often something unseen down in the weeds of processes can rear its ugly head and devastate the organization. This may often have been missed in a pure top-down strategy.
  • No multi-dimensional mapping of risk relationships and impacts. A single risk can impact the organization in different ways and have exponential impact when considered in context of other risks managed in other areas but no one sees the range of related risks. Organizations fail to map risks into different hierarchies of relationships and show a multi-dimensional view of risk, impact, and relationships as it intersects with other risk categories not in the same risk hierarchy (see my post The Titanic: an Analogy of Enterprise Risk).
  • Forcing everyone into a one-size fits all risk analysis methodology. Organizations too often select risk solutions for enterprise or operational risk management that require a one-size fits all approach to risk analysis that ends up watering down risk assessments to the lowest common denominator. Well established approaches for managing risk in areas of the organization get pushed aside and the particular specialized views and details are lost leading to greater exposure. Where health & safety may have been using bow-tie risk analysis they are not forced to use heatmaps and stoplight diagrams. The organization loses depth in risk management by selecting solutions that do not have the breadth of capabilities the organization needs.
  • Lack of risk normalization and aggregation. Organizations attempt enterprise or operational risk management by utilizing solutions that lock them into a single flat view of risk scoring and appetite that creates issues when identifying and managing localized operational threats and opportunities as everything is scaled to an enterprise view. What happens when IT security’s high risk is actually lower than finance’s low risk? Either different departments have to measure all their risks in a single context that fits the entire organization, and they lose a department level perspective that is of value. Or they measure everything at a department, function, process, or project level and fail in enterprise risk reporting as they compare apples and oranges. Very few solutions on the market offer a capability to do risk normalization and aggregation. For effective risk normalization and aggregation, risks must be assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively with standardized methodologies that allow for a view of risk at an enterprise level as well as lower localized levels.
  • Overreliance on heat maps. I have written about my frustration with heat maps for the past 13 years. They provide a false view of risk. The standard two-dimensions are likelihood and impact with the upper right being perceived as the greatest risk of high-likelihood and high-impact. This is false. What organization is having billion-dollar loss events on a regular basis? They are out of business. The greatest risk exposure often is the low likelihood and high-impact events that heat maps fail to call out properly.
  • Lack of supportive risk data. Too often I see very subjective responses to risk assessments. When asked to measure risk in dimensions of likelihood and impact (there are more but we will stick to these as it is most often seen), it is often complete guess work. The organization fails to provide a history of risk events that have materialized top be an event with loss on the organization. When assessing and modeling risk, organizations need a history to mine to see how this risk has materialized in the past within their organization and with peers to be able to objectively score dimensions of likelihood and impact.
Many of these failures in enterprise and operational risk management are the result of organizations selecting GRC and risk platforms that are inadequate for the job. They rely on Gartner and Forrester reports that have a bias toward IT risk management and score and rank risk management solutions in a way that makes no sense. Gartner often only wants to see a ½ hour video demo and sends web surveys to client references. Yet organizations of all sizes are basing their enterprise and operational risk management platform purchases on analyst reports that lack depth (Forrester Waves are very broad in scope), or lack published criteria (Gartner Magic Quadrants are what they say they are, magic as the criteria, and results, are a complete mystery). Organizations need to start thinking about risk management architecture. Organizations are often best served to take a federated approach to risk management that allows different departments some level of autonomy and supports their department level risk management strategies but also enable a common information and technology architecture to support overall enterprise and operational risk management activities and reporting. There is no one-stop risk management solution that does everything risk management for the entire organization. Which solution can provide the best core for enterprise and operational risk management that has the right range of risk mapping, modeling, and analytic needs for the majority of the organization. But then also needs to be able to integrate with best of breed risk solutions that offer specific functionality in areas where needed. Whether for a department risk management need, or to manage enterprise and operational risk across the organization, risk management solutions are in demand. Recent RFP and inquiry trends that GRC 20/20 is involved with show a growing demand for integrated cross-department risk management solutions. There are several hundred solutions available in risk management with varying capabilities and approaches.  Organizations need to clearly understand the breadth and depth of their requirements, map these into risk solutions capabilities, and understand that there is no one size fits all solution for risk management no matter what solution providers may say. It has become a complex segment of the GRC market to navigate, understand, and find the solution(s) that are the perfect fit for your organization. Organizations looking for risk management solutions and intelligence can get objective insight through: GRC 20/20’s next Research Briefing is on How to Purchase Risk Management Solutions & Platforms. Organizations looking for risk solutions should attend to help them scope their requirements and approach the market. AGENDA . . .
  1. Defining & Understanding Risk Management
    • Definition, Drivers, Trends & Best Practices
  2. Critical Capabilities of a Risk Management Platform
    • What Differentiates Basic, Common, & Advanced Solutions
  3. Considerations in Selection of a Risk Management Platform
    • Decision Framework & Considerations to Keep in Mind
  4. Building a Business Case for Risk Management
    • Trajectory of Value in Effectiveness, Efficiency & Agility
The GRC Pundit will help organizations . . .
  • Defineand scope the risk management market
  • Understandrisk management drivers, trends, and best practices
  • Relatethe components of what makes a risk management platform
  • Identifycore features/functionality of basic, common, and advanced risk management platforms
  • Mapcritical capabilities needed in a risk management platform
  • Predictfuture directions and capabilities for risk management
  • Scopehow to purchase risk management platforms in a decision-tree framework
  • Discernconsiderations to keep in mind as you evaluate risk management solutions
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